Congressman Mark Sanford
May 13, 2017 View Online
Weekly Review
May 8:

House Passes the Working Families Flexibility Act: 
As the saying goes, time is money. With that in mind, I’ll keep this post short….

Last week, the House passed H.R. 1180, the Working Families Flexibility Act. The bill would update the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow private-sector employers to give their employees either paid time off or cash wages for overtime hours worked. The bill passed by a vote of 229 to 197 with my vote.

Right now, private employers cannot offer paid time off as a way of “paying” for overtime hours worked; only overtime wages are allowed. This is the case even if the employer and the employee would prefer time off as the payment. In contrast, government employees have had this option for over thirty years. This bill would simply give private sector employees the same choice that federal workers now have.

Making sure to have a good work-life balance is a struggle for many who juggle the demands of the office with the day-to-day of family life. Providing more flexibility lets people choose what’s more important to them at the time: time or money.



May 9:

 

Click above to read Post and Courier article.

 
May 9: 

Debt Limit Control & Accountability Act:
Earlier this year, I introduced the Debt Limit Control and Accountability Act and just learned that FreedomWorks has highlighted it as their Bill of the Month!

I’d like to say thank you to Rep. Mark Meadows for cosponsoring the bill, particularly at a time when Washington doesn’t seem to be paying any attention to the ever-growing mountain of federal debt.

In that regard, I think it’s especially important to recognize the need for spending restraint right now, and this bill would return to Congress the process of setting the debt limit to a dollar sign instead of based on a date...which is how it was set historically.

Indeed, from World War II to 2011, Congress took specific votes on the debt ceiling, setting a dollar limit on exactly how much borrowing would be allowed by the federal government. But since 2011, the dollar amount has been replaced with a window of time and the debt ceiling increase since then has been based on the debt incurred during that period.

This about it this way: You lend a family member your credit card. On the one hand, you stipulate that they can only spend $500 dollars. On the other hand, you simply say that they can use it for the next two months. Which way do you think they would they spend more?

This process is backwards. Instead of allowing the debt to increase to a certain date, Congress should return to setting the debt limit to a maximum amount.


May 11:

Sanford Sends Letter to DHEC: 
Leonardo da Vinci noted that “Water is the driving force of all nature.” And as our population grows, water is increasingly becoming a precious commodity. On this issue, just last week, I sent a letter to the Director of South Carolina’s Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), urging them to delay Google’s permit request to increase groundwater withdrawal to 1.5 million gallons daily.

I did this because I think that taking a moment to develop a comprehensive groundwater management plan is both the responsible and obvious choice here. Pushing through a permit modification without understanding the ramifications just doesn’t make sense. Instead, it seems to me that DHEC should delay Google’s permit request until two studies are finalized, showing the effects of greater groundwater withdrawals on our natural resources.

The Post and Courier highlighted my letter, and, accordingly, I wanted to share with you here…


Click above to read the Post and Courier article

     

 
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